Daily Roundup for January 17, 2018

Daily Roundup for January 17, 2018

Here are the items and resources of interest for January 17, 2018:



Theology/Christianity:

  • I have been blessed by the ministry of Alistair Begg and the Truth for Life program. Specifically, the series “The Pastor’s Study” has been one that has greatly encouraged me.  There are seven volumes in this series. I often listen to these sermons while on my morning and afternoon walk. I commend them to you. You can also get the mobile app for your phone here.
  • On the note of other podcasts, here is a short list of some that I commend to you: The Briefing (Mohler), Christ the Center (Reformed Forum); Confessing Our Hope (Greenville Seminary); Mortification of Spin (Normally these are excellent; Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals). These are typically in my regular rotation when I can find time to listen. My wife loves MOS. 
  • Does podcasting hurt preaching? Read this article and decide for yourself. I know, you may be thinking, “Wow, Bill, you just recommended some podcasts and now you are asking us to read this article.” Well, yes. Indeed. I have often argued that podcasting, the consequences of such that typically produces men who we prefer to listen to, is detrimental to the average member of the church. Read on. 
  • I am late to the game.  R.C. Sproul impacted me in a way that words simply cannot express or measure. Perhaps that is another article for another time.


Technology:

The Daily Roundup is published Monday-Friday at 9 AM ET
Daily Roundup for October 2, 2017

Daily Roundup for October 2, 2017

Here are the items and resources of interest for October 2, 2017:



Theology/Christianity:

Technology:

 

 

 

Daily Roundup for May 19, 2017

Daily Roundup for May 19, 2017

Here are the items and resources of interest for May 19, 2017:

Theology/Christianity:

Technology:

The Daily Roundup is published Monday-Friday. See you next week!

Sermon Database

Sermon Database

I was privileged to exhort often throughout my seminary life.  Now that I am a pastor who has the same privilege of preaching each week I wanted to be sure that every element of the worship service was somehow cataloged for reference and research.  I looked in vain for exactly what I wanted to include in a database. Therefore I wrote my own using Access. I am no expert in Access and the database I created is quite simple, but it does capture all the items I want for each worship service. The list of items I capture are:

 

  • The location, date and time of the service (AM or PM)
  • Call to Worship — The text of scripture that I used for the call to worship
  • Hymns — We have three hymns in our worship.  The first is immediately after the invocation/prayer of adoration.  The second is immediately after the confession of sin and assurance of pardon.  The last is immediately after the sermon. 
  • Confession of Sin — I write the confession of sin that will be used in the worship service structured around the reading of the law (first Scripture reading) used in the worship service. 
  • Confession of Faith — Utilizing the historic creed and confessions, (i.e. The Apostles Creed, the Nicene Creed, etc.).
  • Scripture readings — We have two.  The first is the “Reading of the Law” which precedes the confession of sin.  The second is the sermon text. 
  • Sermon notes — I attach the outline used for that worship service to the database.
  • Sermon quotes — I attach quotes that were used for that worship service if any were used. If I use quotes, they are always on a separate sheet of paper other than my outline. 
  • Sermon text — the passage of Scripture that is immediately related to the sermon.  It may or may not be the second Scripture reading.  Sometimes I read more than the sermon text in the second reading to offer the full context.
  • Sermon outline — the two or three points only. 
  • Notes — my database has a section for my own notes, unrelated to the sermon notes, if needed.

The advantage of having a database structured in this way is that I am now able to search by Scripture or hymn or other items and have the results immediately.  For instance, if I search for a sermon text it will give me the hymns that were used in the worship service. I can share the database I wrote in which you can use and modify as needed.  If you want it, let me know. The database I send will have all of my material, but you can easily delete things and start fresh with your own. 

I can share the database I wrote in which you can use and modify as needed.  If you want it, let me know. The database I send will have all of my material, but you can easily delete things and start fresh with your own. 

Worksheets for Preachers

Worksheets for Preachers

I have designed two worksheets to help me with my translation work as I prepare sermons each week.  They are not flashy, but they get the job done. You can download them below in Excel or PDF format.

When you print them out, set your printer to print on both sides of the paper.  I use the bottom of the page to write out my translation after parsing each word in the text. Each worksheet has space for fifty words.  I think that will cover nearly every verse in the Bible. 

NOTES: I use the bottom of the page to write out my translation after parsing each word in the text. I also make notes in the “translation” box related to grammar (i.e. things like “dative of advantage” and “direct discourse” or “historical present.” the type of pronoun: “personal,” “demonstrative” — things like that).  I also make notes in the margins related to things like “the subject of the sentence,” “the main verb,” “adjectives and what word they modify,” etc. The numbers down the left-hand side of the worksheet correspond to the number in the verse. 

I am also working on other items that I will share as I get them done.