Daily Roundup for July 27, 2017

Daily Roundup for July 27, 2017

Here are the items and resources of interest for July 27, 2017:

 

Theology/Christianity:

Technology:

Miscellaneous:

The debate between paper books and e-readers has been vicious since the first Kindle came out in 2007. Most arguments have been about the sentimental versus the practical, between people who prefer how paper pages feel in their hands and people who argue for the practicality of e-readers. But now science has weighed in, and the studies are on the side of paper books. 

 

Future Book Reviews on Tap

Future Book Reviews on Tap

The following is a list of book I am currently reading that I will be reviewing here on The Parchment. My intention is to write a chapter by chapter review as I am reading. 

My usual practice is to always have a Puritan book in my rotation of morning reading. I typically limit my reading to 15-30 min for each book scheduled. I will write a chapter by the chapter review as I finish each one. 

The Bruised Reed by Richard Sibbes — This is the edition published by the Banner of Truth. In the meantime, you can read this review written by Nick Roark.

From the publisher:

BOOK DESCRIPTION

Richard Sibbes (1577-1635), one of the most influential figures in the Puritan movement during the earlier years of the seventeenth century, was renowned for the rich quality of his ministry. The Bruised Reed shows why he was known among his contemporaries as ‘the sweet dropper’.

The Bruised Reed is now issued for the first time in a smaller format in the Puritan Paperbacks series. Some of the language and punctuation have been modernized to make the work more accessible.

Practical Religion by J.C. Ryle — This edition published by the Banner of Truth

BOOK DESCRIPTION

As with all Ryle’s works, Practical Religion is clear, concise and penetrating. It was designed to be a companion to his other books, Old Paths, Knots Untied and Holiness, providing guidance on how the Christian believer is to live. In Ryle’s own words, it ‘treats of the daily duties, dangers, experience, and privileges of all who profess and call themselves true Christians.’

Far from advocating a works-based religion, these papers are all about how a Christian can practically respond to the grace that has been freely given to him in the person of the Lord Jesus Christ. Ryle was a great enemy of hypocritical and nominal religion, or ‘churchianity’ as he called it. These articles remain a great plea for a real, heartfelt devotion to the Lord in love and service, founded on the great doctrines of Scripture.
No Christian who reads any one of these papers will be left unaffected. ‘Believer in Christ, remember this! Whatever you do in religion, do it well. Be real. Be thorough. Be honest. Be true.’

 

Daily Roundup for July 4, 2017

Daily Roundup for July 4, 2017

Here are the items and resources of interest for July 4, 2017:

Theology/Christianity:

  • Nick Napier, a friend, and graduate of Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary writes a helpful and though provoking article. 

    What is wrong with this? Why is it wrong to “hearken back” to when things were simpler and outwardly more “noble?” Why is it wrong to fantasize that you were born in/live in medieval or Victorian or Edwardian Eras? (For whatever reason, these seem to be the two of which I see most Christian pining.) What is wrong with longing for a bonnet and suspended trousers? Well, there are several reasons Christians should not romanticize time periods or particular cultures:

  • New books you should know — a list compiled by The Gospel Coalition

Technology:

Miscellaneous:

  • It is the 4th of July so this article should be of interest to someone. 
Daily Roundup for June 26, 2017

Daily Roundup for June 26, 2017

Here are the items and resources of interest for June 26, 2017:

Theology/Christianity:

  • Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary has a new website.
  • The extension campus of GPTS has a podcast.  This episode features the subject of corporate prayer meetings with guest Dr. Ryan McGraw.
  • How to Read Your Bible — produced by the Reformed Forum
  • Why I Voted Against the Women’s Study Committee Report — agree or not, this is an interesting article written by one of the voting members of the ad interim study committee. Additionally, this article gives a brief wrap-up on the 45th PCA GA.
  • Perhaps the highest and loftiest acts a Christian can have toward God are worship and prayer. These two acts are uniquely vertical – they are the only things a believer does that are directly toward God and that directly bring him or her into relationship and communion with God. The one exception is the reading of Scripture, but that is a means to bring us to worship and prayer. All other aspects of the Christian life are horizontal – they are outward toward others. Worship and prayer are uniquely God-centred. They deal with God alone and bring us to him relationally. — Read the full article by Mark Tomlinson here.

Technology:

  • Windows 10 Insider Preview is jam packed with new features
  • I use OneNote on a daily basis as I think it is easily the best note-taking app out there. This article regarding internal links is helpful.  If you are a serious user of OneNote or want to learn more, you should visit this website
  • Many of you use Logos Bible Software.  These training videos are helpful and needed.  You might want to check out a new feature called Logos Cloud
  • I left Facebook two weeks ago and have not regretted it.  However, I am still an avid user of Twitter. One of the least used features of Twitter is the ability to make lists. This article and this article discuss it in detail.  I will be writing a full article on this feature soon. 

Miscellaneous:

  • Taking Notes on Books — There are many articles available on the subject of “taking notes” while reading books. I am curious about the methods my readers use to accomplish it. Please write your system in the comments section.  Lord willing, I will be providing some articles on this subject in the days ahead, as well as one of my own. 
Daily Roundup for May 5, 2017

Daily Roundup for May 5, 2017

Here are the items and resources for May 5, 2017:

Theology/Christianity:

I know the ministry isn’t supposed to be easy. There are burdens and anxieties that are particular to pastors (see 2 Corinthians 11:28). Mary Winslow reminded her son, Octavius of this, when she wrote: “When you accepted the pastoral office you commenced a life of trial both from saint and sinner. Oh, do not be surprised at all you meet with.” A good shepherd will bear many of those trials in silence (1 Peter 2:19-23) and endeavor to let love cover a multitude of sins (1 Peter 4:8). But it’s a painful reality. Pastors are only men, and just because they’re public servants doesn’t mean they don’t have private anguish. It hurts when sheep are meticulous fault-finders in everything a pastor says and does. It wounds when sheep lay all the blame only on a pastor’s shoulders. It’s traumatic when sheep hold their pastor to their unbiblical and unrealistic expectations. It aches when sheep neglect the material needs of a pastor and his family. It’s painful when sheep hold things like time, money, and talents hostage unless the pastor does what they want. It’s miserable when sheep secretly round up the opposition failing to go privately to the pastor. It’s abusive when sheep have no regard for a pastor’s emotional, mental, and spiritual well-being. Yes! Sheep can hurt, wound, abuse, and torture the shepherd.

Technology:

 

The Daily Roundup is published Mon-Fri.  See you next week!